Time for the biennial reassessment of whether I actually like Steely Dan (with Dad’s copy of Aja). Previous assessment: Meh.

Time for the biennial reassessment of whether I actually like Steely Dan (with Dad’s copy of Aja). Previous assessment: Meh.

This AP photo of Jack McKeon and Tony Gwynn (via Deadspin) is truly fantastic

This AP photo of Jack McKeon and Tony Gwynn (via Deadspin) is truly fantastic

#Seattle

#Seattle

Coming to New York in 1959 was really exciting. I’d never been there before, and after checking into the hotel we went down to the Five Spot for a rehearsal and I had never seen anything like that before, derelicts lying there on the street. I started to bend down to help one guy and one of the other musicians who was playing the Five Spot said, “What are you doing?” The guy’s lying on the sidewalk! “Hey man, you’re in New York City! You can’t help that, man!” When we started playing every night, the place was packed with people not just from the art world, from everywhere. There were famous painters, poets. One night I was playing — you know, I usually play with my eyes closed — and I happened to open my eyes and looked down and there was Leonard Bernstein with his ear next to my bass, right on the bandstand. He asked me where I’d studied and I told him I was self-taught and he couldn’t believe that. He invited me to come up to the Philharmomic, and years later, when I was sure he had forgotten men, he was of tremendous help to me with the Guggenheim Foundation, when I applied for a fellowship in composition.

One night we were playing, Cherry was taking a solo and all of a sudden I heard the solo change direction and I opened my eyes and it was Miles. He had gotten up on the stand, taken Cherry’s horn and started playing. And there wasn’t a night when I didn’t open my eyes, look out at the audience or the bar and see some great bass player checking me out. Paul Chambers, Percy Heath, Mingus. Those were exciting days. Then we went on the road and scared everyone to death in the towns we played — Boston, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia. The musicians would come to hear us, word had come down the grapevine, people were expecting something new.

Possibly the best two paragraphs ever written about the history of jazz. Charlie Haden recounts the Ornette Coleman Quartet’s 1959 New York debut toMusician Magazine in 1984. He died at the age of 76 on July 11, 2014, leaving Coleman as the last living member of he group that made the first fully-formed statement of avant-grade jazz (drummer Billy Higgins and trumpeter Don Cherry comprised the other half of the groundbreaking group).

My favorite albums of 2014 (so far)

#Seattle

#Seattle

This sunset is not wack #Seattle

This sunset is not wack #Seattle

mightyflynn:

Safeco Field

June 25, 2014

Seattle, Washington

Photo by @sammyyjeann

mightyflynn:

Safeco Field

June 25, 2014

Seattle, Washington

Photo by @sammyyjeann

#latergram Ambrose Akinmusire Quintet last night @ SAM. Ambrose is the most unique trumpet player I’ve ever seen live, an amazing evening. Thanks @ambroseire  (at Seattle Art Museum)

#latergram Ambrose Akinmusire Quintet last night @ SAM. Ambrose is the most unique trumpet player I’ve ever seen live, an amazing evening. Thanks @ambroseire (at Seattle Art Museum)

Notes from above the ground

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